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Beehive NetUI Tutorial

Introduction

The NetUI tutorial is provided as a way to become familiar with NetUI's Page Flow controllers and JSP tags. The tutorial walks through creating, building, and deploying a sample project page flow that uses JavaBeans to submit data from a browser to the server.

Tutorial Goals

  • How to create a basic NetUI web application.
  • How to coordinate user navigation with the @Jpf.Forward annotation and the Forward object.
  • How to handle data submission and processing with databinding and form beans.
  • How to create a user interface with the NetUI JSP tag library.
  • How page flows help to separate data processing and data presentation.
  • How to use declarative validation with data submission.
  • How to collect data from a nested page flow and 'return' it to the calling page flow.
  • How to make an action available to multiple page flows.

Step 1: Setup a Beehive-enabled Web Application

Set Shell Variables

Complete all of the necessary and optional steps in the following topic: Beehive Installation and Setup

Create a Beehive-enabled Web Project

In order to follow the steps in this tutorial, it's necessary to create a Beehive-enabled web application. Beehive-enabled web applications are described here. A skeleton Beehive-enabled web project is provided in the samples/ directory as netui-blank. This contains a basic Ant build file and an example Page Flow controller. To create the tutorial's project, we'll copy and then rename the netui-blank project using these steps:

  1. Create a directory /beehive_projects (on Windows, this would be C:\beehive_projects).
  2. Run the Ant target to create a new NetUI project: ant -f <beehive-root>/beehive-imports.xml new.netui.webapp and provide a fully-qualified web project root directory named pageflow_tutorial when prompted. Note, <beehive-root> is the directory that contains a Beehive distribution; a typical value might be /apache/apache-beehive-1.0.
  3. Before continuing, confirm that the following directory structure exists:
    beehive_projects/
        pageflow_tutorial/
            web/
                Controller.java
                index.jsp
                resources/
                WEB-INF/
            build.properties
            build.xml

Note, this directory structure is just an example; you are free to put the pageflow_tutorial directory anywhere on disk. In the remainder of this tutorial, the directory beehive_projects/pageflow_tutorial will simply be referred to as pageflow_tutorial.

Configure Build Properties

The build.properties file contains several project-related properties that must be set in order to build the web application. Specifically, the paths to your Beehive distribution and to the JSP / Servlet API JARs for your application container must be set. The following steps will set these properties for the pageflow_tutorial webapp.

  1. Open the file pageflow_tutorial/build.properties in a text editor.
  2. Edit the beehive.home property so it points to the top-level folder of your Beehive distribution.
  3. Edit the context.path to use the value pageflow_tutorial.
Note
The context.path property determines both (1) the name of the application WAR file and (2) the application URL.

If context.path=pageflow_tutorial, then the following WAR file will be produced:

    pageflow_tutorial.war

and the following URL will invoke the web application:

    http://someapplicationserver/pageflow_tutorial

For example, if your Beehive distribution is located in /apache/apache-beehive-1.0, then your build.properties file would appear as follows.

beehive.home=/apache/apache-beehive-1.0

servlet-api.jar=${os.CATALINA_HOME}/common/lib/servlet-api.jar
jsp-api.jar=${os.CATALINA_HOME}/common/lib/jsp-api.jar

context.path=pageflow_tutorial
Note
Properties files should use the '/' character to separate drive, directory, and file names.

If you are using an application container other than Tomcat, be sure to set the servlet-api.jar and jsp-api.jar properties to reference the JAR your server provides which contains the JSP and Servlet API classes.

Start the Server

If you are using Tomcat, enter the following at the command prompt:

$CATALINA_HOME/bin/startup.bat

If you aren't using Tomcat, start your application container as per its directions.

Using URLs in the Examples

In the Beehive tutorials, you will often encounter URLs like http://localhost:8080/pageflow_tutorial/Controller.jpf. When you see these URLs, they are meant to be accessed via your web browser to demonstrate functionality built in the tutorial. These URLs are setup to run on Tomcat, so if you are unable to run these URLs, be sure that they are appropriate for your application server. Specifically, check the port numbers to make sure that your server is running on the referenced port.

Step 2: Create your First Page Flow Controller

Overview

In this step you will create a controller class and a JSP. These are the basic files in a Beehive NetUI web application. Each page flow contains one controller class and any number of JSPs. A controller class is a Java class that controls how your web application functions and what it does. The methods in the Controller file determine all of the major features of a web application: how users navigate from page to page, how user requests are handled, and how the web application accesses back-end resources. The JSPs determine what a visitor to the web sees in the browser.

In terms of the Model-View-Controller paradigm for web applications, the Controller.java file is the Controller (naturally) and the JSPs are the View. The web application's Model in this tutorial is very simple: it consists of three fields that represent the user's name, age and selected sport activity.

Controller classes contain Action methods. An Action method may do something simple, such as forward a user from one JSP to another; or it may do a complex set of tasks, such as receive user input from a JSP, calculate and/or retrieve other data based on the user input, and forward the user to a JSP where the results are displayed.

The controller class in this step contains one simple Action method. This simple navigational Action method forwards users to the index.jsp page. In the next step, you will create a more complex Action method.

Examine the Controller.java and index.jsp Files

There are no edits to make in this step. The point of this step is to learn about the code you are about to run.

Open the file pageflow_tutorial/web/Controller.java.

The controller class is an ordinary Java class with methods and annotations.

A Page Flow controller class must extend PageFlowController and be decorated by the annotation @Jpf.Controller.

The onCreate() method is executed whenever the Controller class is first instantiated. The onDestroy() method is executed when the Controller class is destroyed.

After the onCreate() method is run, the NetUI runtime searches for (and runs) a method or action named begin. In this controller class, there is a simple action named begin:

@Jpf.SimpleAction(name="begin", path="index.jsp")

The begin action could have been expressed using method syntax:

@Jpf.Action(
    forwards = { 
        @Jpf.Forward(name="success", path="index.jsp")
    }
)
public Forward begin() {
    return new Forward("success");
}

We have used the Simple Action syntax for the sake of syntactical simplicity. The Simple Action will forward the user to the JSP, index.jsp.

The Controller class is instantiated when a user calls it via the URL:

http://localhost:8080/pageflow_tutorial/Controller.jpf

The URL above means this: "Run the begin action of the Controller.java class in the directory pageflow_tutorial."

Controller.java

import javax.servlet.http.HttpSession;

import org.apache.beehive.netui.pageflow.Forward;
import org.apache.beehive.netui.pageflow.PageFlowController;
import org.apache.beehive.netui.pageflow.annotations.Jpf;

@Jpf.Controller(
    simpleActions={
        @Jpf.SimpleAction(name="begin", path="index.jsp")
    },
    sharedFlowRefs={
        @Jpf.SharedFlowRef(name="shared", type=shared.SharedFlow.class)
    }
)
public class Controller 
    extends PageFlowController
{
    @Jpf.SharedFlowField(name="shared")
    private shared.SharedFlow sharedFlow;

    /**
     * Callback that is invoked when this controller instance is created.
     */
    protected void onCreate()
    {
    }

    /**
     * Callback that is invoked when this controller instance is destroyed.
     */
    protected void onDestroy(HttpSession session)
    {
    }
}

Open the file pageflow_tutorial/web/index.jsp.

index.jsp

<%@ page language="java" contentType="text/html;charset=UTF-8"%>
<%@ taglib uri="http://beehive.apache.org/netui/tags-databinding-1.0" prefix="netui-data"%>
<%@ taglib uri="http://beehive.apache.org/netui/tags-html-1.0" prefix="netui"%>
<%@ taglib uri="http://beehive.apache.org/netui/tags-template-1.0" prefix="netui-template"%>
<netui:html>
  <head>
    <title>Web Application Page</title>
    <netui:base/>
  </head>
  <netui:body>
    <p>
      New Web Application Page
    </p>
  </netui:body>
</netui:html>

Compile and Deploy the Web Application

You are now ready to compile the page flow and deploy it to Tomcat.

The following Ant command assumes that you are in the pageflow_tutorial/ directory. At the command prompt, enter:

ant clean build war

This will build the webapp by running the Beehive annotation processors and will produce class files in WEB-INF/classes. Now, the application is ready to deploy to your server. On Tomcat, copy the WAR file into Tomcat's $CATALINA_HOME/webapps directory.

On Windows:

copy pageflow_tutorial.war %CATALINA_HOME%\webapps /Y

Everywhere else:

cp pageflow_tutorial.war $CATALINA_HOME/webapps

If you are asked to overwrite the old WAR file, enter 'yes'. Note, when doing redeployment, you may have to wait a few seconds for Tomcat to redeploy the WAR file. Once deployment or redeployment has completed, the webapp can be accessed through a browser.

If you are not using Tomcat, follow your server's web application deployment instructions to deploy the webapp.

Test the NetUI Web Application

Visit the following address:

http://localhost:8080/pageflow_tutorial/Controller.jpf

You will be directed to the index.jsp page.

Step 3: Navigation

Create a Destination JSP

In the directory pageflow_tutorial/web, create a file named page2.jsp.

Edit page2.jsp so it appears as follows.

page2.jsp

<%@ page language="java" contentType="text/html;charset=UTF-8"%>
<%@ taglib uri="http://beehive.apache.org/netui/tags-html-1.0" prefix="netui"%>
<netui:html>
  <head>
    <title>page2.jsp</title>
    <netui:base/>
  </head>
  <netui:body>
    <p>
      Welcome to page2.jsp!
    </p>
  </netui:body>
</netui:html>

Save page2.jsp.

Create a Link to the Destination Page

In this step you will create a link from the JSP, index.jsp to a new Simple Action that you will add to the controller class.

Open the file pageflow_tutorial/web/index.jsp.

Edit index.jsp so it appears as follows. The code to add appears in bold type.

index.jsp

<%@ page language="java" contentType="text/html;charset=UTF-8"%>
<%@ taglib uri="http://beehive.apache.org/netui/tags-databinding-1.0" prefix="netui-data"%>
<%@ taglib uri="http://beehive.apache.org/netui/tags-html-1.0" prefix="netui"%>
<%@ taglib uri="http://beehive.apache.org/netui/tags-template-1.0" prefix="netui-template"%>
<netui:html>
  <head>
    <title>Web Application Page</title>
    <netui:base/>
  </head>
  <netui:body>
    <p>
      New Web Application Page
    </p>
    <p>
      <netui:anchor action="toPage2">Link to page2.jsp</netui:anchor>
    </p>
  </netui:body>
</netui:html>

Save index.jsp.

Add a Simple Action to Handle the Link

Open the file pageflow_tutorial/web/Controller.java.

Edit Controller.java so it appears as follows. Don't forget the comma after the first Jpf.SimpleAction(...) element!

Controller.java

import javax.servlet.http.HttpSession;

...

import org.apache.beehive.netui.pageflow.Forward;
import org.apache.beehive.netui.pageflow.PageFlowController;
import org.apache.beehive.netui.pageflow.annotations.Jpf;

@Jpf.Controller(
    simpleActions={
        @Jpf.SimpleAction(name="begin", path="index.jsp"),
        @Jpf.SimpleAction(name="toPage2", path="page2.jsp")
    },
    sharedFlowRefs={
        @Jpf.SharedFlowRef(name="shared", type=shared.SharedFlow.class)
    }
)
public class Controller 
    extends PageFlowController 
{
    ...
}

Save Controller.java.

Compile and Redeploy the Web Application

Compile and deploy the page flow using the same Ant and copy commands used in step 2.

If you are asked to overwrite the old WAR file, enter 'Yes'.

Wait a few seconds for Tomcat to redeploy the WAR file, then move on to the next step.

Test the NetUI Web Application

Visit the following link:

http://localhost:8080/pageflow_tutorial/Controller.jpf

You will be directed to the index.jsp page.

Click the link.

You will be directed to page2.jsp.

Step 4: Submitting Data

Create a Submission Form

This step illustrates the use of custom tags to render an HTML form tag and link it to an Action. In a later step, the new Action will be added to the controller class to handle the data submission.

Edit the file pageflow_tutorial/web/page2.jsp so it appears as follows.

page2.jsp

<%@ page language="java" contentType="text/html;charset=UTF-8"%>
<%@ taglib uri="http://beehive.apache.org/netui/tags-html-1.0" prefix="netui"%>
<netui:html>
  <head>
    <title>page2.jsp</title>
    <netui:base/>
  </head>
  <netui:body>
    <p>
      Welcome to page2.jsp!
    </p>
    <p>
      <netui:form action="processData">
        Name: <netui:textBox dataSource="actionForm.name"/>
        <br/>
        Age: <netui:textBox dataSource="actionForm.age"/>
        <br/>
        <netui:button type="submit" value="Submit"/>
      </netui:form>
    </p>
  </netui:body>
</netui:html>

Save page2.jsp.

Create a Server Side Representation of the Submission Form (a.k.a. Create a Form Bean)

In this step you will create a Java class that represents the submission form created in the previous task. When the form data is submitted, the Java class will be instantiated, and the form data will be loaded into the members of the Java class.

In the directory pageflow_tutorial/src create a directory named forms.

In the directory pageflow_tutorial/src/forms create a JAVA file named ProfileForm.java.

Edit pageflow_tutorial/src/forms/ProfileForm.java so it appears as follows.

ProfileForm.java

package forms;

public class ProfileForm 
    implements java.io.Serializable {

    private int age;
    private String name;

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return this.name;
    }

    public void setAge(int age) {
        this.age = age;
    }

    public int getAge() {
        return this.age;
    }
}

Save and close ProfileForm.java.

Edit the Controller Class to Handle the Submitted Data

Now you will add a new Action and use your new Form Bean to handle the data submitted from the HTML form.

Open the file pageflow_tutorial/web/Controller.java

Edit Controller.java so it appears as follows. Code to add appears in bold type.

Controller.java

import javax.servlet.http.HttpSession;

...

import org.apache.beehive.netui.pageflow.Forward;
import org.apache.beehive.netui.pageflow.PageFlowController;
import org.apache.beehive.netui.pageflow.annotations.Jpf;
import forms.ProfileForm;

@Jpf.Controller(
    simpleActions={
        @Jpf.SimpleAction(name="begin", path="index.jsp"),
        @Jpf.SimpleAction(name="toPage2", path="page2.jsp")
    },
    sharedFlowRefs={
        @Jpf.SharedFlowRef(name="shared", type=shared.SharedFlow.class)
    }
)
public class Controller 
    extends PageFlowController 
{

    @Jpf.Action(
        forwards = { 
            @Jpf.Forward(name="success", path="page2.jsp")
        }
    )
    public Forward processData(ProfileForm form) {
        System.out.println("Name: " + form.getName());
        System.out.println("Age: " + form.getAge());
        return new Forward("success");
    }
    
    ...
    
}

Save Controller.java.

Recompile and Redeploy the Web Application

Compile and (re)deploy the web application using the same steps as described here.

Test the NetUI Web Application

Visit the following link:

http://localhost:8080/pageflow_tutorial/Controller.jpf

You will be directed to the index.jsp page.

Click the link.

You will be directed to page2.jsp.

Enter values in the Name and Age fields, and click Submit.

Notice the name and age values you entered are displayed in the Tomcat console shell.

Step 5: Processing and Displaying Data

Create a JSP to Display Submitted Data

In this step you will create a new JSP to present the results from processing the data submission.

In the directory pageflow_tutorial/web create a file named displayData.jsp.

Edit displayData.jsp so it appears as follows.

displayData.jsp

<%@ page language="java" contentType="text/html;charset=UTF-8"%>
<%@ taglib uri="http://beehive.apache.org/netui/tags-html-1.0" prefix="netui"%>
<netui:html>
  <head>
    <title>displayData.jsp</title>
    <netui:base/>
  </head>
  <netui:body>
    <p>
      You submitted the following information:
    </p>
    <p>
      Name: <netui:content value="${requestScope.data.name}"/>
      <br/>
      Age: <netui:content value="${requestScope.data.age}"/>
    </p>
  </netui:body>
</netui:html>

Save and close displayData.jsp.

Process the Submitted Data

Edit the processData method in the Controller.java file so it appears as follows. Code to add appears in bold.

Controller.java

    ...
                        
    @Jpf.Action(
        forwards = { 
            @Jpf.Forward(name="success", path="displayData.jsp")
        }
    )
    public Forward processData(ProfileForm form) {
        System.out.println("Name: " + form.getName());
        System.out.println("Age: " + form.getAge());    
        getRequest().setAttribute("data", form);
        return new Forward("success");
    }
    
    ...

Save Controller.java.

Recompile and Redeploy the Web Application

Compile and (re)deploy the web application using the same steps as described here.

Test the NetUI Web Application

Visit the following link:

http://localhost:8080/pageflow_tutorial/Controller.jpf

You will be directed to the index.jsp page.

Click the link.

You will be directed to page2.jsp.

Enter values in the Name and Age fields. Click the Submit button.

You will be forwarded to the displayData.jsp page. Notice the values you entered are displayed.

Step 6: Input Validation

Add Declarative Validation to the Page Flow

In this step you will use declarative validation to define the set of rules for each field, to be applied during input validation. Add a ValidatableProperty for the name field of the form so that it will (1) be a required field and (2) have a maximum length of 30 characters. The age field will also be required and must have a value in the range 0 to 130.

Open the file pageflow_tutorial/web/Controller.java

Edit the @Jpf.Action annotation for the processData method in the Controller.java file so it appears as follows. Code to add appears in bold. Don't forget the comma after the forwards={...} element!

Controller.java


...

    @Jpf.Action(
        forwards = {
            @Jpf.Forward(name="success", path="displayData.jsp")
        },
        validatableProperties = {
            @Jpf.ValidatableProperty(
                propertyName = "name",
                displayName = "Name",
                validateRequired = @Jpf.ValidateRequired(),
                validateMaxLength = @Jpf.ValidateMaxLength(chars = 30)),
            @Jpf.ValidatableProperty(
                propertyName = "age",
                displayName = "Age",
                validateRequired = @Jpf.ValidateRequired(),
                validateRange = @Jpf.ValidateRange(minInt = 0, maxInt = 130))
        },
        validationErrorForward =
            @Jpf.Forward(name="fail", navigateTo=Jpf.NavigateTo.currentPage)
    )
    public Forward processData(ProfileForm form) {
        System.out.println("Name: " + form.getName());
        System.out.println("Age: " + form.getAge());
        getRequest().setAttribute("data", form);
        return new Forward("success");
    }

    ...

Save Controller.java.

Modify the JSP to Display Validation Errors

Add the <netui:error> tag to display validation error messages on the page.

Edit the file pageflow_tutorial/web/page2.jsp so it appears as follows.

page2.jsp

<%@ page language="java" contentType="text/html;charset=UTF-8"%>
<%@ taglib uri="http://beehive.apache.org/netui/tags-html-1.0" prefix="netui"%>
<netui:html>
  <head>
    <title>page2.jsp</title>
    <netui:base/>
  </head>
  <netui:body>
    <p>
      Welcome to page2.jsp!
    </p>
    <p>
      <netui:form action="processData">
        Name: <netui:textBox dataSource="actionForm.name"/>
        <netui:error key="name"/>
        <br/>
        Age: <netui:textBox dataSource="actionForm.age"/>
        <netui:error key="age"/>
        <br/>
        <netui:button type="submit" value="Submit"/>
      </netui:form>
    </p>
  </netui:body>
</netui:html>

Save and close page2.jsp.

Recompile and Redeploy the Web Application

Compile and (re)deploy the web application using the same steps as described here.

Test the NetUI Web Application

Visit the following link:

http://localhost:8080/pageflow_tutorial/Controller.jpf

You will be directed to the index.jsp page.

Click the link.

You will be directed to page2.jsp.

Leave the Name field empty and enter a negative integer value in the Age field. Click the Submit button.

You will be returned to the page2.jsp page. Notice the error messages for the values you entered.

Step 7: Collect Data from a Nested Page Flow

Link to the Nested Page Flow

In this task you will modify the HTML form tag to (1) add a new data field and (2) add a button linking to an Action in a nested page flow. (Later you will create the nested controller class to handle the data collection.)

Edit the file pageflow_tutorial/web/page2.jsp so it appears as follows. Code to add appears in bold.

page2.jsp

<%@ page language="java" contentType="text/html;charset=UTF-8"%>
<%@ taglib uri="http://beehive.apache.org/netui/tags-html-1.0" prefix="netui"%>
<netui:html>
  <head>
    <title>page2.jsp</title>
    <netui:base/>
  </head>
  <netui:body>
    <p>
      Welcome to page2.jsp!
    </p>
    <p>
      <netui:form action="processData">
        Name: <netui:textBox dataSource="actionForm.name"/>
        <netui:error key="name"/>
        <br/>
        Age: <netui:textBox dataSource="actionForm.age"/>
        <netui:error key="age"/>
        <br/>
        Sport: <netui:textBox dataSource="actionForm.sport"/>
        <br/>
        <netui:button type="submit" action="getSport" value="Select Sport"/>
        <netui:button type="submit" value="Submit"/>
      </netui:form>
    </p>
  </netui:body>
</netui:html>

Save page2.jsp.

Update the Form Bean

In this task you will update the Java class that represents the submission form with the additional data field created in the previous task. When the nested page flow returns, the new member of the Form Bean class instance can be loaded with the value collected.

Edit pageflow_tutorial/src/forms/ProfileForm.java and add the following member variable and methods.

ProfileForm.java

    ...

    private String sport;

    public void setSport(String sport) {
        this.sport = sport;
    }

    public String getSport() {
        return this.sport;
    }

    ...

Save and close ProfileForm.java.

To Launch and Return from the Nested Page Flow

In this task you will add Action methods: one to handle forwarding to the nested page flow and another to implement the return Action when the nested page flow completes.

Open the file pageflow_tutorial/web/Controller.java

Edit Controller.java so it appears as follows. Code to add appears in bold type. Don't forget to add the useFormBean property to the @Jpf.Action annotation of the processData method. The ProfileForm is page flow-scoped for this example, using the same Form Bean instance in multiple Action methods.

Controller.java

import javax.servlet.http.HttpSession;

import org.apache.beehive.netui.pageflow.Forward;
import org.apache.beehive.netui.pageflow.PageFlowController;
import org.apache.beehive.netui.pageflow.annotations.Jpf;
import forms.ProfileForm;

@Jpf.Controller(
    simpleActions={
        @Jpf.SimpleAction(name="begin", path="index.jsp"),
        @Jpf.SimpleAction(name="toPage2", path="page2.jsp")
    },
    sharedFlowRefs={
        @Jpf.SharedFlowRef(name="shared", type=shared.SharedFlow.class)
    }
)
public class Controller
    extends PageFlowController 
{

    private ProfileForm profileForm;

    /**
     * This action forwards to the nested page flow to collect the sport
     * name.  Note that it takes a ProfileForm so we can update the form
     * with the sport name returned from the nested page flow, but we've
     * explicitly turned validation off for this action, since the form
     * may be incomplete.
     */
    @Jpf.Action(
        useFormBean="profileForm",
        forwards={
            @Jpf.Forward(name="getSportFlow", path="sports/SportsController.jpf")
        },
        doValidation=false
    )
    protected Forward getSport(ProfileForm form) {
        return new Forward("getSportFlow");
    }

    /**
     * This action takes the sport name returned from the nested page flow
     * and updates the field in the form and returns to the original page.
     */
    @Jpf.Action(
        forwards={
            @Jpf.Forward(name="success", navigateTo=Jpf.NavigateTo.currentPage)
        }
    )
    protected Forward sportSelected(String sport) {
        profileForm.setSport(sport);
        Forward success = new Forward("success", profileForm);
        return success;
    }

    @Jpf.Action(
        useFormBean="profileForm",
        forwards = {
            @Jpf.Forward(name="success", path="displayData.jsp")
        },
        validatableProperties = {
            @Jpf.ValidatableProperty(
                propertyName = "name",
                displayName = "Name",
                validateRequired = @Jpf.ValidateRequired(),
                validateMaxLength = @Jpf.ValidateMaxLength(chars = 30)),
            @Jpf.ValidatableProperty(
                propertyName = "age",
                displayName = "Age",
                validateRequired = @Jpf.ValidateRequired(),
                validateRange = @Jpf.ValidateRange(minInt = 0, maxInt = 130))
        },
        validationErrorForward =
            @Jpf.Forward(name="fail", navigateTo=Jpf.NavigateTo.currentPage)
    )
    public Forward processData(ProfileForm form) {
        System.out.println("Name: " + form.getName());
        System.out.println("Age: " + form.getAge());
        getRequest().setAttribute("data", form);
        return new Forward("success");
    }
    
    ...
    
}

Save Controller.java.

Create a Nested Page Flow

In this task you will create a nested page flow with actions to select and confirm the data to return to the main ("nesting") page flow. The new nested controller class contains an inner Form Bean classs for the data collection. It has only a single field for the user's choice of sport activity. The options to be displayed are declared as member data of this nested page flow. After the user confirms the data, the nested page flow returns a String to the main page flow.

In the directory pageflow_tutorial/web create a directory named sports.

In the directory pageflow_tutorial/web/sports create a Java file named SportsController.java.

Edit pageflow_tutorial/web/sports/SportsController.java so it appears as follows.

SportsController.java

package sports;

import org.apache.beehive.netui.pageflow.FormData;
import org.apache.beehive.netui.pageflow.Forward;
import org.apache.beehive.netui.pageflow.PageFlowController;
import org.apache.beehive.netui.pageflow.annotations.Jpf;

@Jpf.Controller(
    nested = true,
    simpleActions = {
        @Jpf.SimpleAction(name="begin", path="index.jsp")
    }
)
public class SportsController
    extends PageFlowController {

    private String selectedSport;
    private String[] sports = {"sailing", "surfing", "diving", "volleyball", "bicycling"};

    public String[] getSports() {
        return sports;
    }

    public String getSelectedSport() {
        return selectedSport;
    }

    @Jpf.Action(
        forwards = {
            @Jpf.Forward(name="confirm", path="confirm.jsp")
        }
    )
    public Forward selectSport(SportForm form) {
        selectedSport = form.getSport();
        return new Forward("confirm");
    }

    @Jpf.Action(
        forwards = {
            @Jpf.Forward(
                name="success",
                returnAction="sportSelected",
                outputFormBeanType=String.class)
        }
    )
    public Forward confirm() {
        return new Forward("success", selectedSport);
    }

    public static class SportForm 
        extends FormData {

        private String sport;

        public void setSport(String sport) {
            this.sport = sport;
        }

        public String getSport() {
            return this.sport;
        }
    }
}

Save and close SportsController.java.

To Present and Collect Data using a Form

This task illustrates the use of custom tags to render a radio button group in an HTML form and link it to the nested page flow selectSport Action method.

In the directory pageflow_tutorial/web/sports, create a file named index.jsp.

Edit index.jsp so it appears as follows.

index.jsp

<%@ page language="java" contentType="text/html;charset=UTF-8"%>
<%@ taglib uri="http://beehive.apache.org/netui/tags-html-1.0" prefix="netui"%>
<netui:html>
  <head>
    <title>Select Sport</title>
    <netui:base/>
  </head>
  <netui:body>
    <p>
      Select Sport Activity
    </p>
    <p>
      <netui:form action="selectSport">
        <table>
          <tr>
            <td>Sports:</td>
            <td>
              <netui:radioButtonGroup dataSource="actionForm.sport"
                      optionsDataSource="${pageFlow.sports}"/>
            </td>
          </tr>
        <table>
        <netui:button type="submit">Submit</netui:button>
      </netui:form>
    </p>
  </netui:body>
</netui:html>

Save index.jsp.

Confirm the Selected Data

In the directory pageflow_tutorial/web/sports, create a file named confirm.jsp.

Edit confirm.jsp so it appears as follows.

confirm.jsp

<%@ page language="java" contentType="text/html;charset=UTF-8"%>
<%@ taglib uri="http://beehive.apache.org/netui/tags-html-1.0" prefix="netui"%>
<netui:html>
  <head>
    <title>Confirm Sport Activity</title>
    <netui:base/>
  </head>
  <netui:body>
    <p>
      Confirm Sport Activity
    </p>
    <p>
      Sport: <netui:content value="${pageFlow.selectedSport}"/>
    </p>
    <netui:form action="confirm">
        <netui:button type="submit" value="Confirm"/>
    </netui:form>
  </netui:body>
</netui:html>

Save confirm.jsp.

Update the JSP to Display Submitted Data

In this step you will update the JSP to present the results from processing the data submission.

In the directory pageflow_tutorial/web update the file named displayData.jsp and add code to display the additional data. The code to add appears in bold type.

Edit displayData.jsp so it appears as follows.

displayData.jsp

<%@ page language="java" contentType="text/html;charset=UTF-8"%>
<%@ taglib uri="http://beehive.apache.org/netui/tags-html-1.0" prefix="netui"%>
<netui:html>
  <head>
    <title>displayData.jsp</title>
    <netui:base/>
  </head>
  <netui:body>
    <p>
      You submitted the following information:
    </p>
    <p>
      Name: <netui:content value="${requestScope.data.name}"/>
      <br/>
      Age: <netui:content value="${requestScope.data.age}"/>
      <br/>
      Sport: <netui:content value="${requestScope.data.sport}"/>
    </p>
  </netui:body>
</netui:html>

Save and close displayData.jsp.

Recompile and Redeploy the Web Application

Compile and (re)deploy the web application using the same steps as described here.

To Test the NetUI Web Application

Visit the following link:

http://localhost:8080/pageflow_tutorial/Controller.jpf

You will be directed to the index.jsp page.

Click the link.

You will be directed to page2.jsp.

Click the "Select Sport" button.

You will be directed to sports/index.jsp in the nested page flow.

Click a radio button and then the Submit button.

You will be directed to sports/confirm.jsp in the nested page flow.

Click the Confirm button.

You will be returned to the page2.jsp page. Notice that the value you selected is displayed in the Sport field.

Step 8: Adding Actions to a Shared Flow

To Create a Common Destination JSP

In the directory pageflow_tutorial/web, create a file named help.jsp.

Edit help.jsp so it appears as follows.

help.jsp

<%@ page language="java" contentType="text/html;charset=UTF-8"%>
<%@ taglib uri="http://beehive.apache.org/netui/tags-html-1.0" prefix="netui"%>
<netui:html>
  <head>
    <title>Help Page</title>
    <netui:base/>
  </head>
  <netui:body>
    <p>
      Welcome to the Help Page
    </p>
  </netui:body>
</netui:html>

Save help.jsp.

To Make an Action available to multiple Page Flows

In this task you will add a Simple Action to the existing Shared Flow. The Action forwards to the help page created in the previous task and will be available to multiple page flows in the application.

Open the existing Shared Flow file pageflow_tutorial/src/shared/SharedFlow.java

Edit the @Jpf.Controller annotation for the Shared Flow controller class, SharedFlow, in the SharedFlow.java file and add the simpleActions property. Code to add appears in bold. Don't forget the comma after the catches={...} element!

SharedFlow.java

...

@Jpf.Controller(
    catches={
       @Jpf.Catch(type=PageFlowException.class, method="handlePageFlowException"),
       @Jpf.Catch(type=Exception.class, method="handleException")
    },
    simpleActions={
        @Jpf.SimpleAction(name="showHelp", path="/help.jsp")
    }
)
public class SharedFlow
    extends SharedFlowController {
    ...
}

Save SharedFlow.java.

To Link a Page to the Shared Flow Action

In this task you will create a link from the JSP, index.jsp to the Shared Flow Action.

Open the file pageflow_tutorial/web/index.jsp.

Edit index.jsp so it appears as follows. The code to add appears in bold type.

index.jsp

<%@ page language="java" contentType="text/html;charset=UTF-8"%>
<%@ taglib uri="http://beehive.apache.org/netui/tags-databinding-1.0" prefix="netui-data"%>
<%@ taglib uri="http://beehive.apache.org/netui/tags-html-1.0" prefix="netui"%>
<%@ taglib uri="http://beehive.apache.org/netui/tags-template-1.0" prefix="netui-template"%>
<netui:html>
  <head>
    <title>Web Application Page</title>
    <netui:base/>
  </head>
  <netui:body>
    <p>
      New Web Application Page
    </p>
    <p>
      <netui:anchor action="toPage2">Link to page2.jsp</netui:anchor>
    </p>
    <netui:anchor action="shared.showHelp" popup="true">Help
      <netui:configurePopup location="false" width="550" height="150">
      </netui:configurePopup>
    </netui:anchor>
  </netui:body>
</netui:html>

Save index.jsp.

Recompile and Redeploy the Web Application

Compile and (re)deploy the web application using the same steps as described here.

Test the NetUI Web Application

Visit the following link:

http://localhost:8080/pageflow_tutorial/Controller.jpf

You will be directed to the index.jsp page.

Click the help link.

A popup window with the help.jsp page will be displayed.